What Tom’s Reading: Churchill & Orwell, HumbleDollar, breaking the smartphone addiction

Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom

Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom is described as a dual biography of Churchill and Orwell, who preserved democracy from the threats of authoritarianism, from the left and right alike.

Publishing house Penguin Random House:

Both George Orwell and Winston Churchill came close to death in the mid-1930’s—Orwell shot in the neck in a trench line in the Spanish Civil War, and Churchill struck by a car in New York City. If they’d died then, history would scarcely remember them. At the time, Churchill was a politician on the outs, his loyalty to his class and party suspect. Orwell was a mildly successful novelist, to put it generously. No one would have predicted that by the end of the 20th century they would be considered two of the most important people in British history for having the vision and courage to campaign tirelessly, in words and in deeds, against the totalitarian threat from both the left and the right. In a crucial moment, they responded first by seeking the facts of the matter, seeing through the lies and obfuscations, and then they acted on their beliefs. Together, to an extent not sufficiently appreciated, they kept the West’s compass set toward freedom as its due north.

Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom Thomas E. Ricks

HumbleDollar

HumbleDollar Humble Dollar

The HumbleDollar is a blog edited by Jonathan Clements, a financial writer and author that I greatly admire. The objective of the blog is to ” tell you everything you need to know about money—all in one place, and without the hype and hollow promises that characterize so much financial writing.”

From the site:

Managing money may be simple, but it isn’t easy. Most of us struggle to save diligently, invest intelligently and figure out what will make us happy.

Want a happier, more prosperous financial future? We advocate a relentless focus on the things you can control. Try to spend thoughtfully, save diligently, hold down investment costs, minimize taxes, avoid unnecessary investment risk, buy insurance against major financial threats and give some thought to your heirs. And as you do all of these things, keep an eye on the big picture, so you don’t shortchange one of your financial goals or end up with a yawning gap in your insurance coverage.

Recent post topics include personal finance, whether you really need an emergency fund in retirement, “hidden gems” that can save you a lot of money, and tax breaks that can accelerate deduction for 2018 in 2017.

How to Break Your Smartphone Addiction

smartphone addictionIn many ways technology is revolutionary, and there’s one device that has transformed our lives — the smartphone. They are with us most of the time, they record our life events, and offer us easy access to information. But they can also make us feel anxious when we don’t have our phone in-hand, and they can interrupt our work and free time.

New York University marketing and psychology professor Adam Alter discusses his new book, Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked in this podcast (with transcript). Alter explains how we are hardwired for addiction and what to do about it.

What Tom’s saying – Arizona Business Magazine

Tom was recently featured in Arizona Business Magazine’s 2018 edition of “Arizona Business Leaders,” where he provided a industry outlook:

Arizona Business Leaders Tom Connelly

Tom Connelly is the President and Chief Investment Officer at Versant Capital Management, Inc. His background is not only financial – he has considerable interests other than just making money. His broad curiosity informs and inspires Tom to create an expansive context to investment numbers, which leads to deeper and more strategic conversations with clients.

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